✍ All sorts of new and exciting things coming up for the cast of L to the Third so stay tuned!

Thursday, July 7, 2011

A colonial church visit

Aquia Church

Located a few miles north of Government Island off of Route 1 is the historic Aquia Episcopal Church, which was constructed of brick and Aquia sandstone in the mid-eighteenth century.  I've always wanted to visit the site, having read about it in my years of working as a researcher at the antiques gallery in Alexandria.  It's possible to make arrangements to tour the interior of the church, which remains much as how it originally appeared after it was first constructed, including a highly unusual three-tiered pulpit, but since this was a visit on a whim, Sammy and I had to make do with stroll around the grounds.

Pediment inscription at Aquia Church

Inscribed on the Aquia sandstone pediment surmounting the side entrance is a brief history of the building: "Built/AD 1751 Destroyed/By Fire 1754 & Rebuilt AD 1757/By Mourning Richards, Undertaker/William Copein, Mason."

View of Aquia Church from the cemetery 500

The cemetery was filled with tombstones dating back to the seventeenth century; sadly many of the older examples had been made with the eponymous Aquia sandstone, which does not hold up well to the elements (which is why the quarry eventually went into decline) and had all but deteriorated to the point of complete illegibility.

Detail of angel carving on 1738 tombstone at Aquia Church cemetery

While the text may have vanished, the carved decorative elements were still strong on some of them; this worn and weathered angel can be found on the grave of Reverend Alexander Scott, who died in 1738.

The Daily Wyatt

14 comments:

Ashley Sisk said...

I seriously love historic buildings like that...especially colonial churches. My mom always loved that style so I think it rubbed off on me. I think the architecture is beautiful and I find myself pretending I was from that time. I'm not sure I would have liked it.

Maeve's Momma said...

I have a fascination for graveyards, particularly English ones with their Celtic knotwork and crosses. I love the picture of the angel/skull and crossbones you took!

annoyed army wife said...

Love these photos. I could walk around historical sites with amazing old architecture for hours.

Linda Makiej said...

Wonderful photos!! I especially love the last one- spooky and beautiful at the same time!

Marilyn said...

Awesome Photo's, found you on texture Thursday.. Officially following you HAPPILY.. ;)) Hope you can visit me sometime.. TY

Tara said...

I love old buildings and they make for great photographs, loving the last one!

Casey Martinez said...

What great shots of the church! ISn't history fascinating!! I love seeing old things and imagining how people once lived. Graveyards are especially intriging..the names, the dates, things quoted onstones. Call me morbid but it is interesting to me!

melifaif said...

Wow!! I am blown away with your photos and the history. Fabulous.

Evelyn S. said...

I love to see and read what history buffs produce like this! Beautiful.

Nadege, said...

Grand looking church. Isn't history fascinating.

Chic Homeschool Mama said...

Oh wow- what an amazing place. I could spend forever there capturing everything I laid my eyes on.

Sarah said...

Gorgeous photos. Love the historic buildings.

Veronica Lee said...

Old buildings are my thing especially English ones. Loving every one of your pics, L!

Happy Friday!

Kim said...

They are all really great shots. My favorite is the last one. I love seeing old things like that.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...